Reblogged from gabifresh

micdotcom:

Powerful photos capture the student protests in Mexico barely anyone is talking about 

While the world has focused its attention on the pro-democracy protests in Hong Kong, there’s another student movement gaining steam on the other side of the world.

The unfolding protests gripping Mexico began in the small town of Iguala, in the southwest region of Guerrero state, where the disappearance of 43 student teachers on the night of Sept. 26 has sparked outrage amid allegations of collaboration between local police and organized crime.

Reblogged from All things Mexico.

gyzym:

mydollyaviana:

disneyismyescape:

carry-on-until-its-gone:

wish-upon-the-disney-star:

This scene is SO important. Maleficent is with someone she trusts, someone she considers a friend. And then the next thing she knows, she wakes up in pain, bleeding, with her wings burned off. A huge part of her has been destroyed.

Rape is so prominent in our culture that it is in a Disney movie. Maybe not explicitly, but it is very clear what this scene represents and it is so sad.

I fucking cried my eyes out during this scene

AJ even confirmed that this is what this scene was a metaphor for (x) - just because i saw someone say today that this is not what this scene is about

'We were very conscious that it was a metaphor for rape': The actress explained how the scene in which her character has her wings ripped off her body while in a drug-induced sleep had to be something 'so violent and aggressive' that it would make her 'lose all sense of her maternity, her womanhood and her softness' 

when a man violates a woman, he cuts off her wings.

No, no, no, no, no, please imagine some people singing the word no in a four part harmony because: noooooooooooooo.

I understand that this is well intentioned, and I’m not going to comment on the movie itself since I’ve only seen bits and pieces, but I just had to pop up and register the hardest of passes to the sentiment, “When a man violates a woman, he cuts off her wings.” LET’S NOT SAY THAT EVER. When a man violates a woman (or a woman violates a woman, or a man violates a man, or a woman violates a man), it is harmful and indescribably painful, it may even be life-altering, but let’s please, please, please try to avoid saying shit that implies that being sexually assaulted or raped is something that permanently disfigures you, that removes something from you that you can never get back, that prevents you — forever — from flying. You know what that plays into? The idea of the “ruined” woman; the idea that once assaulted or raped you are defined by it for the rest of your life; the idea that a rape or assault is not something you can heal from. Don’t push those concepts — they get into people’s heads and become very difficult to eradicate. They make it an even harder struggle for survivors to believe in the open wide future they’re going to get to eventually (I promise), where what happened to them, though it will always be with them, does not keep them grounded.

On a related note, I said I wasn’t going to comment on the movie itself and I meant it, and this isn’t intended as hate against Angelina Jolie because I adore her and she has done a ton of amazing work in so many arenas including this one, plus I’m fairly certain from the structure that that quote was one about her specific character that was simply chopped up to look like it was a statement about all women, but! Because it is important and needs to be said: anyone who tells you that rape makes women “lose all sense of her maternity, her womanhood and her softness,” is someone who does not know what the hell they are talking about. Can a rape strip a woman of some or all those things, temporarily or permanently? Yes, of course; so could the loss of a partner, or the loss of a child, or any number of other things. Rape is a significant trauma and significant trauma has significant consequences! But those consequences differ from person to person and circumstance to circumstance, and again what we’ve encountered here is the idea of the “ruined” woman, who has been raped and thus robbed forever of [her womanhood/her personhood/her sexuality/her desire for men/her maternal instinct/her tenderness/her what the fuck ever, oh my god]. Stop saying this shit! People believe it and it harms them, and the process of getting through a rape or assault is arduous enough without fighting past the totally false idea that no matter what you do you are ruined and will never truly heal. Thanks.

Reblogged from not language but a map

gothsportscore:

i don’t want to be a part of a college system where plagiarism is a worse crime than rape

Reblogged from the base of ln
allcreatures:


A baby manatee approaches its mothers for a peck on the cheek. The bond between calves and their mothers is the closest in manatee families and can last up to two years. Photographer Carol Grant captured the intimate moments on camera at the Crystal River National Wildlife Refuge in Florida.

Picture: Carol Grant/Caters News (via Animal photos of the week - Telegraph)

allcreatures:

A baby manatee approaches its mothers for a peck on the cheek. The bond between calves and their mothers is the closest in manatee families and can last up to two years. Photographer Carol Grant captured the intimate moments on camera at the Crystal River National Wildlife Refuge in Florida.

Picture: Carol Grant/Caters News (via Animal photos of the week - Telegraph)

Someone calling a white person ‘wonder bread’ isn’t racist. It’s rude, but it’s not racist. Wonder bread as an offensive term has no weight, no meaning. It’s just something to push your buttons. Using the N-word is racist - it has meaning and weight and brings up a past that should’ve never happened. The comparison between rude and racist is like squares and rectangles - every square is a rectangle, but not every rectangle is a square. Every racist comment you hear is rude, but not every rude comment you hear is racist.
— from an in-class debate about white supremacy (via seehowtame)